Faces of Harvest: Lynn Moore, Pittsburg

Posted June 19, 2018

Each year, more than 20,000 Kansas wheat farmers take dramatic risks to grow the wheat that feeds the world. We hope you enjoy learning more about these farmers through our series, “The Faces of Harvest.”

 

By: Kaitlyn Vicker, Kansas Wheat Intern

Lynn Moore, a farmer from Pittsburg, Kansas, is one of the 25,000 plus female farmers in Kansas. She runs a fourth generation farm with three different companies of 6,500 acres, where they grow corn, beans and wheat.

Lynn Moore, a farmer from Pittsburg, Kansas, is one of the 25,000 plus female farmers in Kansas. She runs a fourth generation farm with three different companies where they grow corn, beans and wheat.

Lynn Moore, a farmer from Pittsburg, Kansas, is one of the 25,000 plus female farmers in Kansas. She runs a fourth generation farm with three different companies of 6,500 acres, where they grow corn, beans and wheat.

Moore said she choose this career because her family did it for most of their lives and she wanted to help out.

”I got into farming mainly because it gave me the opportunity to be around for the kids when they were little, which you can’t do if you work for a factory,” Moore said.

 One of the impacts for Moore working on the farm is helping other communities understand where their food comes from and the work provided to produce their food. She said she has found in smaller communities, both kids and some adults, do not understand where their food is from.

 “I think working on the farm has taught me to slow down, to respect the land and the people around me,” Moore said. “I have also learned to appreciate where my food comes from and how much hard work to takes get it there.”

Even though Moore’s parents are semi-retired, they still help on the farm when needed and are actively helping the management of the farm as well. Moore shares the responsibility of management with two key employees, one fields operations manager and an office manager and accountant. Currently, Lynn manages seven employees, six full-time and one part-time, not including herself and her parents.

“I enjoy all the memories I’ve made with each of the employees and their families,” Moore said. “I’m really good friends from some of the past employees who have moved on. All of that is very valuable to me. I couldn't do this without these key employees.”

Female farmers are eight percent of the world’s population, and with Moore being a woman in agriculture, she said it’s difficult at times and expectations are high. Lynn feels that pressure and knows that she has to work harder to prove that she really is outstanding in her field.

“A man beginning his career, other farmers would be glad to teach them,” Moore said. “For women, sometimes they just want to do it for them, rather than show them.”

Moore’s hopes for the farm is to expand as more acres become available, to become more efficient at what they do and to thrive through the next few years. She also expressed agriculture is ever-changing and if a career in agriculture is something you want to pursue, you need to be flexible with all plans.

“I would like to be able to continue to provide jobs for employees and encourage our younger generation employees to carry on the agricultural practices, so it doesn’t die out,” Moore said.

“Agriculture is constantly a transitional journey because you can’t be set in your mind with one direction,” Moore said. “One thing I struggled to learn is you can have a plan but make sure you know that plan is going to change. You have to be able to see all directions and you have to see what is coming that you have to change. I think that’s anything in life, but especially in agriculture.”