Harvest Report, Day 13

Posted June 28, 2017

This is day 13 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

In Delphos, Steve Hoesli, general manager of Delphos Co-Op Association, said harvest began June 12.

“So far we’ve taken in over one million bushels of wheat,” he said.

He added yields have been averaging 50-60 bushels per acre and test weights have been around 61.5.

“Proteins have been down around 10 percent and SY Wolf has been a variety standing out for farmers so far,” said Hoesli.

As most western Kansas farmers and elevators have seen, wheat streak mosaic virus continues to be a problem, even in the north central parts of Kansas.

“Mosaic has been our biggest issue, but we’ve seen about all of them,” Hoesli added.

He said weather has been particularly good in their area, but now they’ve been hit with scattered showers.

“I’m expecting we should be done before the Fourth of July. This rain slowed us down quite a bit. There are a few stragglers, but hopefully we will be done around that time,” said Hoesli.

Roger Snodgrass is part owner and manager of McDougal-Sager and Snodgrass Grain Inc., of Atwood.

“We’ve just begun and have taken in 10,000 bushels of wheat. We have seen yields ranging all the way from 10 to 65 bushels per acre,” said Snodgrass. “Test weights have been averaging 45 to 63 pounds per bushel.”

This year’s harvest near Atwood has seen variable proteins, ranging from below average to 14 percent.

He feels this year will be a good crop in the area with the decent test weights and average yields.

“The scattered showers have moved into our area as well,” Snodgrass noted. “Farmers have barely been able to get into the fields.”

Snodgrass reported wheat streak has not had a large effect on most of the area’s wheat, but the fields that have been hit are suffering.

“It’s scattered across the whole county, but for the fields that have been hit hard, those are the ones that won’t do as well,” said Snodgrass.

He added that with the heavy snowfall that hit Kansas the end of April, he feels that wheat will have broken over stems and will be difficult to cut.

The 2017 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. For exclusive #wheatharvest17 content, please head to facebook.com/kansaswheat.